The crafty chemist

RSS

dimethylsulfoxide:

Nice colors from my last separation (ether in the organic layer, copper sulfate as the inorganic)

stackedcrates:

my-own-superman:

bromancing-the-stone:

platredeparis:

bnycolew:

mannysiege:

Progress

What

Imma just let this sit here

Science

Neato

[original paper]
Also, note that this technique (CRISPR/Cas9) is not a part of our immune system, as the article above says - it’s derived from a species of bacteria.

stackedcrates:

my-own-superman:

bromancing-the-stone:

platredeparis:

bnycolew:

mannysiege:

Progress

What

Imma just let this sit here

Science

Neato

[original paper]

Also, note that this technique (CRISPR/Cas9) is not a part of our immune system, as the article above says - it’s derived from a species of bacteria.

rtamerica:

Alien pollution might allow scientists to narrow in on extraterrestrial life
A group of scientists say they might have found a way to detect if alien life exists on faraway planets. First, however, they’ll have to find out if extraterrestrials pollute as much as the inhabitants of Earth.
The crux of a paper published in the latest edition of the Astrophysical Journal Letters relies on the theory that, should aliens exist, then perhaps they could be discovered here on Earth by using a high-tech telescope able to monitor space for certain gasses expected to be emitted by distant civilizations. 

rtamerica:

Alien pollution might allow scientists to narrow in on extraterrestrial life

A group of scientists say they might have found a way to detect if alien life exists on faraway planets. First, however, they’ll have to find out if extraterrestrials pollute as much as the inhabitants of Earth.

The crux of a paper published in the latest edition of the Astrophysical Journal Letters relies on the theory that, should aliens exist, then perhaps they could be discovered here on Earth by using a high-tech telescope able to monitor space for certain gasses expected to be emitted by distant civilizations. 

Newly discovered gut virus lives in half the world's population | Science Codex

wildcat2030:

Odds are, there’s a virus living inside your gut that has gone undetected by scientists for decades. A new study led by researchers at San Diego State University has found that more than half the world’s population is host to a newly described virus, named crAssphage, which infects one of the most common types of gut bacteria, Bacteroidetes. This phylum of bacteria is thought to be connected with obesity, diabetes and other gut-related diseases. The research appears today in Nature Communications. Robert A. Edwards, a bioinformatics professor at SDSU, and his colleagues stumbled upon the discovery quite by accident. Working with visiting researcher and corresponding author on the study Bas E. Dutilh, now at Radboud University Medical Center in The Netherlands, the researchers were using results from previous studies on gut-inhabiting viruses to screen for new viruses. In the DNA fecal samples from 12 different individuals, they noticed a particular cluster of viral DNA, about 97,000 base pairs long, that the samples all had in common. When Edwards and his colleagues checked this discovery against a comprehensive listing of known viruses, they came up empty. The researchers then screened for the virus across the database of the National Institute of Health’s Human Microbiome Project (HMP), and Argonne National Laboratory’s MG-RAST database, and again found it in abundance in samples derived from human feces. To prove that the viral DNA they discovered in their computer data actually exists in nature, fellow SDSU virologist John Mokili used a technique known as DNA amplification to locate the virus in the original samples used to build NIH’s database. “So we have a biological proof that the virus they found with the computer actually exists in the samples,” Mokili said. This was a new virus that about half the sampled people had in their bodies that nobody knew about. “It’s not unusual to go looking for a novel virus and find one,” Edwards said. “But it’s very unusual to find one that so many people have in common. The fact that it’s flown under the radar for so long is very strange.”

The chicken project

Welsh designer Kieren Jones explains how he constructed a miniature factory to transform the uneaten parts of a chicken into a gold leather flying jacket and a bone china eggcup and spoon.

Makes me re-evaluate the bones on my plate. Plus there’s a little bit of basic science behind the role of Calcium in bones if you watch the video (see source). 

(Source: dezeen.com)

trigonometry-is-my-bitch:

The Wankel engine cycle (or Rotary engine)

In the rare cases where actual psychological differences exist, they cannot be attributed to innate neurology alone. Everything in the brain is a combination of nature and nurture. Culture comes into play, which affects behavior, which then affects the brain. From birth (and even in the womb), a baby is labeled as a girl or boy and treated a certain way as a result. For example, a 2005 study of 386 birth announcements in Canadian newspapers showed that parents tend to say they’re “proud” when it’s a boy and “happy” when it’s a girl. Anne Fausto-Sterling, a biologist at Brown University, has shown that mothers talk to infant girls more than infant boys. This could partly explain why girls tend to have better language skills later on. “Some differences end up fairly entrenched in adult human beings,” Fausto-Sterling says. “But that doesn’t mean that you were born that way or that you were born destined to be that way.”

- Stop Looking For ‘Hardwired’ Differences In Male And Female Brains | Popular Science (via brutereason)

misbehavedscientist:

molecularbiologistproblems:

You know you’ve been working too long in the lab when….
Which one(s) are you guilty of?

#54… oh yeah! I love the stuff

#43 and I walked halfway to the train station with my lab coat on before I realized…
Not #25 though… aside from the fact that it wouldn’t taste that great being slightly acidic (pH is around 5) due to atmospheric carbon dioxide replacing any dissolved salts, it’s not good for you. If drinking too much regular water in a short amount of time can kill you through diluting the salts in your blood, deionized water is going to be much more effective at doing that.
Oh and you’d probably go blind from the traces of methanol in the absolute alcohol if you tried #19.

misbehavedscientist:

molecularbiologistproblems:

You know you’ve been working too long in the lab when….

Which one(s) are you guilty of?

#54… oh yeah! I love the stuff

#43 and I walked halfway to the train station with my lab coat on before I realized…

Not #25 though… aside from the fact that it wouldn’t taste that great being slightly acidic (pH is around 5) due to atmospheric carbon dioxide replacing any dissolved salts, it’s not good for you. If drinking too much regular water in a short amount of time can kill you through diluting the salts in your blood, deionized water is going to be much more effective at doing that.

Oh and you’d probably go blind from the traces of methanol in the absolute alcohol if you tried #19.

cenchempics:

VIBRANT A flask contains monoacetyl ferrocene prepared by George Osbourn in an undergraduate chemistry lab at the University of Sheffield. 
Credit: George Osbourn

cenchempics:

VIBRANT A flask contains monoacetyl ferrocene prepared by George Osbourn in an undergraduate chemistry lab at the University of Sheffield.

Credit: George Osbourn

medicalthoughtdump:

Scale of Infectious Dosedef: the AMOUNT of pathogen (ie NUMBER of organisms) required for cause infection in a host.

medicalthoughtdump:

Scale of Infectious Dose
def: the AMOUNT of pathogen (ie NUMBER of organisms) required for cause infection in a host.

(Source: ndusmle)